Agro Climatic Zone

 

Raisen District Map

Description of Agro Climatic Zone and Farming situation of the district

Raisen District lies in the central part of Madhya Pradesh. The District is situated between the latitude 22o 47’ and 23o 33’ North and the longitude 77o 21’ and 78o 49’ East. It is bounded in the West by Sehore District, in the North by Vidisha District, in the East and South-East by Sagar District, in the South-East by Narshingpur District and in the South by Hoshangabad and Sehore District. District is 8,395 sq. km, which contains the 1.93% of the states area. The total population of Raisen District is 1,25,154 in 1506 villages. The soils of the region are vertisol of various depth from Medium to deep. The patches of light texture soil with murrum & rocks strata are also found near hill region. The problem of drainage during wet seasons & cracks during dry season are common. The soil have high water holding capacity & low fertility in terms of N&P. The average rainfall of the district is 1317 mm with temperature range of 6-45o c. The main Kharif crops for the district are Soybean, Pigeonpea, Maize, Jowar, Urd & major Rabi Crops are Wheat, Gram, Lentil, Pea & Linseed.

 

BASIC INFORMATION OF RAISEN DISTRICT  

1 Agro climatic zone   Vindhya Plateau
2 Latitude  22o 33' N -  22o 47' N  
3 Longitude

77o  21' E - 78o 49' E

4 Climate    
  Rainfall   1327mm  
  Temperature   06-45o c  
5 Soils  

Medium Black,   Shallow Black, Loamy,  Light Gravelly  

  Geographical area   848.7 thousand ha  
7 Net sown area   428.3 thousand ha
8 Total cropped area   533.70 thousand ha
9 Total irrigated area   194.60 thousand ha  
10 Major crops    
 

Kharif  

Soybean, Pigeonpea, Maize, Jowar, Urd.
  Rabi   Wheat, Gram, Lentil, Pea, Linseed.  
11 Number of Tehsil   7
12 Number of Development Blocks   7
13 Rural population   11,25,154  
14 Male population   5,98,247 (53.10 %)  
15 Female population   5,26,907 (46.8 %)  
16 Number of cultivator   108499  
17 Marginal   19199 (17.6 %)  
18 Small   27815 (25.6 %)  
19 Medium   53008 (48.8 %)  
20 Big Farmer   8477(7.81 %)  
 
12   Irrigation Status

 

Source of Irrigation 

Number

Area (ha)

Major tanks/Dams

2

36190

Medium tanks/Dams

2

230

Other tanks

24

8621

Lift irrigation

7

11600

Tube wells

10649

75497

Wells

10495

27170

Total

 

194686

 

District Population ( Based on Census 2001)

District

Population

Population of 0- 6 Age Group

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Raisen

595730

524429

1120159

107112

101036

208148

 

Tehsil Wise Population (Based on Census 2001)

Tehsils

Population

Population of 0-6 Age Group

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Raisen

102104

91014

193118

19389

18571

37960

Goharganj

114135

99280

213415

20906

19345

40251

Begamganj

67918

58825

126743

12078

12447

24525

Gairatganj

55924

48836

104760

10238

9740

19978

Silwani

66153

59839

125992

12620

11782

24402

Bareli

116716

102228

218944

19642

18045

37687

Udaipura

72780

64407

137187

12239

11106

23345

Urban Area  Population (Based on Census 2001)

Urban Area

Population

Population of 0-6 Age Group

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Begamganj

16084

14479

30563

2633

2481

5114

Sanchi

3604

3181

6785

536

525

1061

Gairatganj

4294

3801

8095

698

644

1342

Raisen

18747

16806

35553

2818

2631

5449

Sultanpur

4664

4052

8716

861

714

1575

Mandideep

22484

17414

39898

3755

3323

7078

Udaipura

7399

6391

13790

1113

1009

2122

Badi

8531

7563

16094

1364

1315

2679

Obedullahganj

10530

9425

19955

1529

1476

3005

Bareli

14599

12792

27391

2095

1961

4056

 

Literacy

Year

Rural Literacy   ( % )

Urban Literacy   ( % )

Total Literacy   ( % )

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

Male

Female

Total

1991

49.82

20.45

36.13

65.78

52.42

65.10

54.02

25.47

40.76

 

Land Usages (In Hectares)

Area

Forest Area

Non Agriculture Land

Land Usages for other then Agriculture

Agriculture Land

Waste Land

Total Crop Area

631748

116674

43354

24595

11816

3294

562420

Road Statistics ( In Kilo meters )

Pakka Road

Kachha Road

Total Road

PWD

Nagar Palika

Total

PWD

Nagar Palika

Forest Area

Total Kachha Road

790.09

38

1124

231.80

52

1082

1481

260

Govt. Hospitals / Dispensaries / PHC’s

Govt. Hospitals & Dispensaries>

Beds

Govt. Hospitals & Dispensaries

Primary Health Center

Sub Health Center

Ayurvedic/ Homeopathic/ Unani

Allopathic

Other

10

19

175

30

360

0

Post Offices

Main Post Office

Sub Post Office

Branches

1

17

187

School & Ashrams

Primary School

Middle School

High School

Higher Secondary

College

Technical Institutes

Ashrams

1833

631

87

43

12

01

14

 

Fair Price Shops

Tehsil

Fair Price Shop

Urban

Rural

Total

Co-Operative

Private

Raisen

84

0

7

77

84

Goharganj

79

0

11

68

79

Begamganj

67

0

7

60

67

Gairatganj

54

0

0

54

54

Silwani

69

0

0

69

69

Bareli

83

0

7

76

83

Udaipura

48

0

4

44

48

Places to Visit

Sanchi

Located on the foot of a hill- Sanchi is just 46 kms Bhopal. It is more of a village than a town. Sanchi is a religious place with historical and Archaeological significance. Sanchi is a site for the numerous stupas which were built on a hill top. The place is related to Buddhism but not directly to the life of Buddha. It is more related to Ashoka than to Buddha. Ashoka built the first stupa and put up many pillars here. The crown of famous Ashoka pillars, with four lions standing back to back, has been adopted as the national emblem of India.

Sanchi adopted Buddhism which replaced the prominent Hinduism. But time took its toll and slowly both the stupas and the place were forgotten. In 1818 Sanchi was rediscovered and it was found that the marvelous pieces of structure were not in good shape. Gradually historical and the religious significance of the place was recognise d. Restoration work of the stupas started in 1881 and finally between 1912 and 1919 these were carefully repaired and restored. It was accepted that the structure at Sanchi are the most organised construction which went into the engineering of temples in the medieval period. The carvings here are done with the precision of Jewellers.

Despite the damage and restoration work done Sanchi is the most evocative and attractive Buddhist site in India. Sanchi is primarily a place of Stupas and pillars but the gorgeous gateways add grace to the place. These gateways are beautifully carved and carry scenes from the life of Buddha or Ashoka. These gateways are the finest specimens of early classical art, which formed the seed bed of entire vocabulary of later Indian art. The images carved on the pillars and the stupas tell moving story of the incidents form the life of Buddha.

STUPAS: Sanchi has been famous for the Stupas which were built on the top of a hill. The purpose of these stupas was mostly religious. The most likely use of the stupas has been said to keep the relics. Some of these stupas have been found containing relics of disciples of Buddha. The stupas date as early as the 3rd century and are built in brick made of stone. Though most of the stupas are in ruins now three remain intact and are of great archaeological value. The designs and the carvings on the walls and gates of these stupas spell a heavenly grace and are very tastefully done.

The Four Gate Ways - The Four gateways constructed in 35 BC are the best from of Buddhist expression one can find any where in the world. Gateways or Torans as they are called are covered with explicit carving which depict scenes from the life Buddha and Jatakas, the stories relating to Buddha and his earlier births. At this stage Buddha was not represented directly but symbols were used to portray him-- The lotus represents his birth, the tree his enlightenment, the wheel, derived from the title of his first sermon, the footprints and throw symbolising his presence. The carvings on the Torans are done with inspired imagery which in harmony with the surrounding figures balance the solidity of massive stupas.

The Ashoka Pillar - The Ashoka pillars is one many pillars which are scattered in the area some of these are in broken and some in shape. The Ashoka pillar is on the southern entrance. Today here only the shaft stands and the crown is kept in the museum. The crown is the famous four lions which stand back to back. This figure was adopted as the national Emblem of India. The Ashoka pillars are an excellent example of he Greco-Buddhist style and is known for the aesthetic proportions and the exquisite structural balance.

The Buddhist Vihara - The earlier monasteries were made from wood which was exquisitely carved and tastefully decorated. The present monasteries are not even the shadow of what they were in the past. A few kms from Sanchi are the relics of the Satdhara Stupa. The relics are kept in glass casket which is placed on the inner sanctum of the modern monastery.

The Great Bowl - Sanchi had a huge bowl carved out of single rock. Grain was stored in this bowl and it was distributed among the monks in Sanchi.

The Gupta Temple - This temple is now in ruins. But what ever is left tells a saga of greatness and a temple which had no match during its times. The temple was built in 5 the century and is an excellent example of ancient temple architecture in India.

The Museum - The archaeological survey of India maintains a museum which house many items which were discovered during the excavation of Sanchi area. Most prized possession of the museum is the lion crown from Ashoka pillar. The museum has a sizeable collection of utensils and other items used by the monks who lived here.

Bhojpur

Founded by the legendary Parmar king of Dhar, Raja Bhoj (1010-53), and named after him, Bhojpur, 28 km from Bhopal, is renowned for the remains of its magnificent Shiva Temple and Cyclopean dam.

The temple, which has earned the nomenclature of the Somnath of the East, is known as the Bhojeshwar Temple. In plan a simple square, with an exterior dimension of 66 feet, it is devoid of the re-entrant angles usual in such buildings. The richly carved dome, though incomplete, has a magnificent, soaring strength of line and is supported by four pillars. These, like the dome, have been conceived on a massive scale, yet retain a remarkable elegance because of their Bhojeshwar Temple tapering form. Divided into three sections, the lowest is an octagon with facets of 2.12 feet, from which springs a 24-faced section.

Richly carved above, the doorway is plain below, throwing into sharp relief the two exquisitely sculpted figures that stand on either side. On the other three sides of the structure are balconies, each supported by massive brackets and four intricately carved pillars. The lingam in the sanctum rises to an awe-inspiring height of 7.5 feet with a circumference of 17.8 feet. Set upon a massive platform 21.5 feet square, and composed of three superimposed limestone blocks, the architectural harmony of lingam and platform creates a superb synthesis of solidity and lightness.

The temple was never completed, and the earthern ramp used to raise it to dome-level still stands. Had it been completed, it would have had very few rivals. As it is, even with the ravages of time, it remains one of the best examples of temple architecture of the 12th and 13th centuries.

Also incomplete, and with a similar stone-raising ramp, is a Jain shrine that stands close to the Bhojeshwar temple. Three figures of the tirthankaras are contained within, one being a colossal statue of Mahavira 20 feet high, and the other two of Parsvanath. Rectangular in plan, this temple probably belongs to the same period as the Bhojeshwar.

West of Bhojpur once lay a vast lake, but nothing remains except the ruins of the magnificent old dams by which its waters were contained. The site was chosen with great skill, as a natural wall of hills enclosed the whole area except for two gaps, 100 yards and 500 yards in width respectively. These were closed by gigantic earthern dams, faced on both sides with enormous blocks of sandstone, many being 4 feet long, 3 feet broad and 2.5 feet thick, set without mortar. The smaller dam is 44 feet high and 300 feet thick at the base, the larger dam 24 feet high with a flat top 100 feet broad. These embankments held up an expanse of water of about 250 square miles. This great work is ascribed to Raja Bhoj, but it may possibly be of an earlier date.

The lake was destroyed by Hoshang Shah of Malwa (1405-34), who cut through the lesser dam, and thus, either intentionally or in a fit of destructive passion, added an enormous area of the highest fertility to his possessions. According to a Gond legend, it took an army of them three months to cut through the dam, and the lake took three years to empty, while its bed was not habitable for thirty years afterwards. The climate of Malwa is said to have been considerably altered by the removal of this vast sheet of water.

Bhimbethika

Surrounded by the northern fringe of the Vindhyan ranges, Bhimbetka lies 46 km south of Bhopal. In this rocky terrain of dense forest and craggy cliffs, over 600 rock shelters belonging to the Neolithic age were recently discovered. Here, in vivid, panoramic detail, paintings in over 500 caves depict the life of the prehistoric cave-dwellers, making the Bhimbetka group an archaeological treasure, an invaluable chronicle in the history of man.

Executed mainly in red and white with the occasional use of green and yellow, with themes taken from the everyday events of aeons ago, the scenes usually depict hunting, dancing, music, horse and elephant riders, animals fighting, honey collection, decoration of bodies, disguises, masking and household scenes. Animals such as bisons, tigers, lions, wild boar, elephants, antelopes, dogs, lizards, Hunting scene - a popular motif with rock painters crocodiles etc. have been abundantly depicted in some caves. Popular religious and ritual symbols also occur frequently.

The superimposition of paintings shows that the same canvas was used by different people at different times. The drawings and paintings can be classified under seven different periods:

Period I - (Upper Paleolithic): These are linear representations, in green and dark red, of huge figures of animals such as bisons, tigers, and rhinoceroses.

Period 11- (Mesolithic): Comparatively small in size, the stylised figures in this group show linear decoration on the body. In addition to animals, there are human figures and hunting scenes, giving a clear picture of the weapons they used: barbed spears, pointed sticks, bows and arrows. The depiction of communal dances, birds, musical instruments, mother and child, pregnant women, men carrying dead animals, drinking and burials appear in rhythmic movement.

Period 111 - (Chaleolithic): Similar to the paintings of Chaleolithic pottery, these drawings reveal that during the period the cave dwellers of this area had come in contact with the agricultural communities of the Malwa plains and started an exchange of their requirements with each other.

Period IV & V - (Early Historic): The figures of this group have a schematic and decorative style, and are painted mainly in red, white and yellow. The association is of riders, depiction of religious symbols, tunic-like dresses and the existence of scripts of different periods. The religious beliefs are represented by figures of yakshas, tree gods and magical sky chariots.

Period Vl & Vll - (Medieval): These paintings are geometric, linear and more schematic, but they show degeneration and crudeness in their artistic style.

The colours used by the cave dwellers were prepared combining manganese, haematite, soft red stone and wooden coal. Sometimes the fat of animals and extracts of leaves were also used in the mixsure. The colours have remained intact for many centuries due to the chemical reaction resulting from the oxide present on the surface of the rocks.

Trend of area/productivity of 3-4 major crops grown in Kharif & rabi, cropping pattern

S.N.

CROP

AREA (000’ HA)

Avg.

PRODUCTION (000 TONES)

Avg.

PRODUCTIVITY (KG/HA)

Avg.

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

 

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

 

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

 

1.

SOYBEAN

70.60

69.70

108.50

132.00

147.40

105.64

54.00

66.77

125.86

165.00

173.93

117.112

765

958

1160

1250

1180

1062.6

5.

PADDY

8.30

12.40

14.90

16.25

19.94

14.35

12.45

22.32

29.80

34.10

28.91

25.52

1500

1800

2000

2098

1450

1769.6

7.

MAIZE

3.40

3.40

7.10

7.6

5.40

5.38

8.50

8.16

18.10

20.485

8.37

12.723

2500

1021

2550

2695

1550

2063.2

8.

ARHAR

22.30

19.90

21.00

22.25

44.40

25.97

22.95

14.18

27.43

29.729

48.84

28.62

1029

713

1338

1336

1100

1103.20

9.

MOONG

0.60

0.90

2.10

2.35

2.10

1.61

0.31

0.49

1.28

1.527

0.95

0.91

525

550

610

650

450

557

10.

URD

0.90

1.10

4.10

4.55

2.90

2.71

0.56

0.71

2.95

3.867

1.31

1.88

625

650

720

850

950

759

12.

WHEAT

178.0

178.40

180.00

190.00

147.00

174.68

320.41

355.10

396.0

428.20

224.76

344.89

1800

1990

2200

2253

1529

1954.4

13.

GRAM

133.10

135.90

150.0

144.5

145.30

141.76

138.42

183.87

205.51

201.37

162.59

180.15

1040

1353

1370

1394

1119

1255.20

15.

LENTIL

41.60

41.80

46.10

48.000

45.50

44.6

48.26

41.79

46.10

50.400

26.98

42.70

1160

976

1000

1050

593

955.80

17.

LINSEED

4.40

3.40

4.00

4.18

2.50

3.69

3.00

1.86

2.40

2.64

1.50

2.28

680

547

600

632

601

612

 Status of livestock in brief

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

S. No.

Block

Milch

Sheep No.

Goat No.

Poultry Birds

Piggery

Cows

Buffaloes

Backyard

Farm

Exotic

Local

L

UP

E

L

UP

E

1

Sanchi

10740

1060

0

3708

185

0

130

12125

10195

13000

0

380

2

Gairat Ganj

4864

486

0

8496

424

0

70

8775

7926

0

0

290

3

Begum Ganj

8663

553

0

10053

505

0

0

10445

14230

0

0

260

4

Silwani

11540

968

0

2766

152

0

336

12375

13195

0

0

355

5

Bari

15068

1650

0

5199

275

0

0

13210

12270

0

0

395

6

Udaipura

7737

655

0

4889

435

0

0

11315

11220

0

0

290

7

Obedulla Ganj

9404

1260

0

3119

280

0

470

12115

13120

28450

0

325

 

Total

68016

6632

0

38230

2256

0

1006

80360

82156

41450

0

2295

L = Local

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UP = Upgraded

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E = Exotic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Land utilization & irrigation status (in graphical form)

 

Information on Land use pattern in the RAISEN (M.P.) District.

S. No.

Name of the Block

Geographical Area

Cultivatable Area

Cultivated Area

Cultivable waste

Current Fallow

Forest

Pasture

Land put to non agri. Use

Land under misc. plantation

Barren & unculturable land (waste land)

Reserved

Open

1

Sanchi

136018

64027

62088

1335

604

59627

265

5790

5916

15

378

2

Gairat Ganj

92011

51510

50574

742

194

9444

25552

1927

2977

30

571

3

Begum Ganj

91197

62161

57406

4154

601

1455

21905

2264

3309

6

97

4

Silwani

128982

57387

55336

1289

762

20560

42137

5093

3768

34

3

5

Bari

141907

91838

89800

1360

678

11319

25440

2439

10819

18

34

6

Udaipura

81686

63092

61490

1179

423

12191

0

2014

4185

7

197

7

Obedulla ganj

176945

57214

54348

2018

848

102402

1375

4953

8724

5

2272

 

Total

848746

447229

431042

12077

4110

216998

116674

24480

39698

115

3552

 

Thrust Area of District -

 

Potential of the District-

§         Rice is becoming a very favourite crop of the district the area and production has increased in last 3 Yrs

§         Vegetable and fruit cultivation is also becoming popular in the area number of farmers under Horticulture schemes are increasing.

§         Livestock rearing & good management practice can lead to more production and income as farmers are interested in this stream we have good potential in this sector also.

§         Improve agriculture implements have great potential to improve production and help in reducing drudgery in the district there is also good potential for soil & water conservation.

§         Improved varieties of seed in all crops have good potential, as farmers now understand the importance of good seed stock.